Home > Symposium 2018 > Programme Outline > Concurrent Session Sign-Up

Concurrent Session Sign-Up

Please click here to sign up for the Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session Details


Concurrent Session 1: 3pm to 3.40pm

No

Presenters

Abstract

1

Hannah Chia,

Centre for Strategic Futures, Strategy Group, Prime Minister’s Office

Invited Speaker

Future Trends & Implications for Education in Singapore (FULL)

 (Venue: Raffles Room)

Uncertainty about the future creates anxiety in the present. This is indeed the experience of educators, students and parents within our education context. Yet the emerging signs of what the future could look like need not heighten anxieties. Instead they provide an opportunity to reflect on and clarify the role that schools and teachers play in preparing our children for the future. This session presents some of the future trends affecting education and suggests possible ways that educators can respond.

2

Ng E-Hong; Noraidee Binte Abdul Sukor,

St. Andrews Junior College

Discipline:

Mother Tongue

Oral Presentation - Let's Assess

(Venue: D215)

In the study of Mother Tongue Languages (MTL), many students have difficulties in developing oral skills. To engage the students and help them to prepare, organise and deliver oral presentation (OP) effectively is therefore, challenging for MTL teachers. Oral skills are part of the 21st Century Competencies and increasingly essential for employment prospects. It is therefore paramount for us to develop our students as skilled MTL communicators.

Our project aims to improve students' competency in OP in terms of content within the 2 minutes duration given in their oral examination. We deliberately designed an MTL OP framework for Teaching & Learning. Video resources, an OP answering template using PEEL, audio exemplars and rubrics formed the bedrock of students' learning. Teacher-Self-Peer assessments with timely feedback using the SAS model were employed.

Our findings indicated an improved clarity of thought and quality in terms of content and organisation. Hence, students were able to utilise the 2 minute duration given more effectively. Samples of students’ works will be shared during the workshop.

3

Rachel Pang; Nina Chun,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Science

Effective Pedagogies in the Teaching and Learning of Chemistry

(Venue: D216) 

In their seminal work Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom, Bonwell and Eison defined strategies that promote active learning as "instructional activities involving students in doing things and thinking about what they are doing".  They suggested that active learning might be a continuum that moves from simple tasks to complex tasks.  Simple tasks are short, relatively unstructured such as pause procedure, class discussion and think-pair-share, while complex tasks include cooperative groups, team-based learning and experiential learning.

 

Participants of the workshop will learn how Active Learning Process is adopted in designing a good chemistry lesson. We would be going through a sample Chemistry lesson to showcase how an abstract concept can be made more relevant and relatable to our students. The participants will also learn how team-based learning is adapted and used in the teaching of chemical calculations.

4

Yeo Puay Hong, Leung Hui Leng,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Design & Technology

A Hands-On Introduction to Arduinos in Schools

(Venue: Magic Lab)

The advent of technologies such as Arduino microcontrollers has given the man-in-the-street access to tools that were once used exclusively by trained professionals. “Now, almost anyone can innovate. Now almost anyone can make. Now, with the tools available at a makerspace, anyone can change the world” (Hatch, 2014). Hence, the notion of literacy has to be extended to include the use of technology (Leu, 2003) and to bring the notion of makerspace into school-based learning in order for students to participate fully and meaningfully in the world they are living in. But before teachers can do that, they, themselves, need to know how the technology works. The workshop consists of an introductory hands-on session with Arduinos, followed by a quick overview of how teachers can best introduce technology literacy in STEM.

5

Aliah Shariff,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Humanities

Inquiry-Based Strategies in A Humanities Classroom

(Venue: E208)

The role of the teacher in an inquiry-based classroom is rather different from that of a teacher in a conventional classroom. Instead of providing direct instruction to students, teachers help students generate their own content-related questions and guide the investigation that follows. There are strong arguments for choosing an inquiry-based approach over more conventional models of direct instruction, especially in allowing both high- and low-ability students to make academic gains (Applebee, Arthur N., Judith A. Langer, Martin Nystrand and Adam Gamoran. 2003). An inquiry-based curriculum teaches students to pose difficult questions, fosters the desire and skills to acquire knowledge about the world, and lets students take ownership of their learning.

In my Humanities classes of Inquiry and Advocacy (I&A) and Area Studies (AS), the inquiry-based approach is the common model of instruction. This workshop seeks to share two strategies: Community of Inquiry (COI) in an I&A class and Socratic Seminar in an AS class. An educational COI is a group of individuals who collaboratively engage in purposeful critical discourse and reflection to construct personal meaning and confirm mutual understanding. The COI theoretical framework represents a process of creating a deep and meaningful (collaborative-constructivist) learning experience through the development of three interdependent elements - social, cognitive and teaching presence. In a Socratic Seminar activity, students help one another understand the ideas, issues, and values reflected in a text through a group discussion format. Students are responsible for facilitating their group discussion around the ideas in the text. Through such discussion, students practise how to listen to one another, make meaning, and find common ground while participating in a conversation.

Participants in this workshop will learn of the theoretical underpinnings of these strategies, learn of how I&A and AS students have engaged in them and consider how these strategies can be adapted for their own classes.

6

Stella Picca, Malyanah Bte Mawar,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline: 

English Language

Writing the Local

(Venue: D218)

Why teach creative writing? Can creative writing be taught anyway? What is our role as teachers to encourage creative writing? Should our students be taught and assessed in creative writing? “Human beings yearn to share, reflect, and understand one another, and they use these reflections to improve the state of things, both personal and public. If we want our students to have this kind of impact, we have to teach them to express themselves with both precision and passion.” We argue that creative writing can and should be taught in school. It can even be assessed if the criteria are clear and the students have been adequately prepared for it. If we don't write our stories, then who will?

7

Azahar Noor,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Humanities

Maximizing Impact on Student Learning

(Venue: E207)

Formative evaluation is among the most powerful factors in John Hattie’s Visible Learning (2016), allowing the teacher to use data on student learning to improve instructional process to benefit learners. Formative evaluation is a form of feedback from the learner to the teacher, and focuses on the goals of the learning process, and seeks to determine whether learners have reached the goals or success criteria (Hattie and Zierer, 2018). 

This sharing is based on the presenter’s own classroom practice that seeks to maximize student learning by undertaking a formative evaluation to identify the gaps between the stated learning goals for a curriculum unit, and whether learners have attained the goals. It allows the teacher to gather critical feedback from students, provides an opportunity for the teacher to identify instructional “blind spots” and make necessary adjustments to close the learning gaps before the onset of summative assessment at the end of the curriculum unit. After all, is it not the objective of all pedagogical efforts for all students to achieve the stated learning goals?

Used in tandem with formative assessment tasks and teacher feedback, this formative evaluation practice can be construed as a four-step process: formulating clear learning goals, describing success criteria, assessing students’ attainment of learning goals and making the necessary instructional adjustments. This sharing will outline the above-mentioned process, and give particular emphasis on learning goals as critical to learner success.

8

Syazwani Amrun,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Humanities

Creating a Positive and Joyful Learning Environment in our Classrooms

(Venue: D221)

One of the four core Teaching Processes at the heart of Pedagogical Practices in Singapore Teaching Practice (STP) is creating a positive classroom culture. In this workshop, I will be sharing a few strategies based on Positive Psychology that we can apply as we teach in class that will help build the joy of learning amongst our students. In turn, this will help create an environment where student engagement is not only increased but our students are empowered to learn and grow into reflective, resilient persons.

9

Arfah Bte Buang (SST), Aurelius Yeo (SST), Shasikumaran (ESS), Siew Chin Hoong Addie (ESS), Chiu Wee Meng (NYGH)

School of Science & Technology (SST), Edgefield Secondary School (ESS), Nanyang Girls’ High School (NYGH)

Topic:

ICT

Harnessing 1:1 - Inter-school Sharing on “Curriculum Design” (FULL)

(Venue: Cyber Learning Centre) 

With the advent of 1:1, schools have the opportunity to gain more buy-in with students, many of whom are comfortable with interacting in a hyper-stimulated, applied learning frame of mind. While approaches such as Applied Learning and Challenge Based Learning may not be new, the use of devices has helped to push the envelope for authentic transfer task nested in real-life context. This presents interesting challenges and opportunities in embedding processes, formative assessments, multiple perspectives and learner-centredness. There will also be a segment on formative feedback and feedforward in helping students learn better. Do join us here.

10

Tan Wei Lun, Adrian Yao Zhi Wei,

Catholic High School

Discipline:

Science

Infusing Parallel Curriculum Model into the Teaching of Electricity in Lower Secondary Science

(Venue: D222)

Catholic High School adapted the Parallel Curriculum Model (PCM) to design a challenging and innovative curriculum for its Integrated Programme. PCM, through the four essential parallels of Core, Connection, Practice and Identity, is geared towards holistically developing high-performing students while being responsive to the ascending intellectual demand of these students. CHS’ IP is thus premised on the philosophy that students are on a spiralling continuum of growing from novice to expert in connected dimensions across academic and non-academic disciplines. CHS’ implementation of PCM is also guided by the four tenets of its Progressive Academic Curriculum, which comprises Thinking Skills, Innovative Pedagogies, Differentiated Instruction and Holistic Assessment, and serves to frame the current practices of the school in relation to national syllabus and policy such as 21CC and Singapore Teaching Practice.

This presentation will illustrate how teachers from CHS’ Physics Unit utilised the PCM to design a module for the lower secondary Science topic of Electricity. This module aims to encourage students to think beyond the classroom lessons. The performance task for this module is the designing and prototyping of a house model with working lighting circuits.

The module starts with the Core Curriculum, where students were taught concepts of electricity circuits, to equip them with the knowledge for the performance task that served as assessment of learning. Students were given a case study scenario based on an actual power plant project in Myanmar, to guide them in appreciating the application of concepts taught in class. Through the performance task designed as the Curriculum of Practice, the students worked in groups to consider the feasibility of a similar proposal through the perspectives of different stakeholders. The adoption of the persona of different stakeholders and various assessments for learning activities enabled students to relate key ideas of electricity to complex real-world issues beyond the scope and domain of Science. The various tasks within the project embraced the universal concept of Change, linking all the various threads of the project into a singular conceptual underpinning. This linking of the various parts of a module through the universal concept and cross-disciplinary learning also invokes the fundamental principle of the Curriculum of Connections.

For the Curriculum of Identity, the module provided students with an opportunity to reflect on their access to electricity as a Singapore citizen, and how their personal life and aspiration relate to this field of science. This deepening of learning and internalisation were enhanced through an invited speaker who, as the main investor in the power plant project in Myanmar, provided real-world perspective on career opportunities and challenges in the area of engineering and large-scale projects.

Hence, in comparison to the traditional way of teaching students about electricity and circuitry through pen-and-paper work, CHS IP students were given a richer opportunity to explore and experiment with the theoretical concepts of electricity, not just as a textbook topic but as a living and transformational scientific phenomenon. Through the module, students also came away with a deeper understanding of the social issues arising from electrification and also the lack of it.

11

Masturah Abdul Aziz, Tan Yen  Chuan,

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic: 

Professional Development

The Role of a Professional Learning Community in Enhancing Teaching and Learning

(Venue: E206)

This study investigated how participation in a PLC contributed to teachers’ knowledge and practice; and by extension, to student learning outcomes. Numerous studies have expounded the ability of professional learning communities (PLCs) to benefit teachers’ classroom practices and student learning outcomes (Vescio, Ross, & Adams, 2008). However, the struggle is real for schools to effectively implement and sustain PLCs which impact teaching and learning. It therefore becomes a prerogative for schools to understand the outcomes of PLCs on teaching practice and student learning. The PLC in this context refers to a white space carved out during school curriculum hours for teachers and school leaders to work on pedagogical issues and engage in professional discourse. A case study approach was used, comprising a mixed-method design. A school-wide survey was administered, followed by teacher interviews and PLC recordings from various departments. Student focus group discussions were piloted to elicit students’ perspectives about their learning experiences in school, and artefacts from the PLC such as online discussions, repositories, and minutes were reviewed. The findings and recommendations were elucidated using the professional language of the Singapore Teaching Practices (STP). Results from the data suggested that the PLC had the strongest effect on teachers' assessment literacy and curriculum design practices. While some areas of learning from the PLC were observed to be translated into teaching and learning practices in the classroom, findings also highlighted a need for teachers to use PLC time to engage in consistent, in-depth reviews on how teaching practices have made a difference to students’ learning. Recommendations such as drafting an action plan to enhance review processes were proposed and implemented. This study concluded that the PLC retains its value and significance in the building of a collaborative work culture, and in facilitating the development of individual and collective capacities in knowledge creation and problem-solving.

12

Lim Ai Khim,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Science

Investigating Active Learning in a Biology Classroom through an inquiry Approach for High Ability Learners

(Venue: D223)

In many classrooms today, “Teaching by telling” remains the predominant mode of instruction despite emerging research evidence that point to the need to shift from an information-transfer, teacher-centred model to one that is concept-focused, learner-centred and collaborative. Work by Van Tassel-Baska (2003) supports the use of inquiry-based learning (IBL) for high-ability learners to promote the development of scientific processing and synthesis skills, such as observation, prediction, inference, interpretation and experimentation. Recent studies conducted on undergraduate students have reported improvements in students’ interests, confidence, synthesis and processing skills in the areas of Science and Engineering through active learning or guided inquiry.

Drawing on the work “Harvard Project Zero” by Ron Ritchhard (2011), this study aimed to investigate the use of inquiry-based learning to promote active thinking and learning in a Biology classroom for high-ability learners aged 16 years and below.

In this study, 160 high-ability learners aged 15 to 16 went through a cycle of guided scientific inquiry where they designed a dialysis machine. Using thinking routines and Socratic questioning, students worked collaboratively to design, build and test their machines for proof-of-concepts. Through a constructivist-driven experience, students derived new knowledge on this topic. In the control group, traditional lecturing and worksheets were used as forms of information transfer tools. Pre- and post-diagnostic tests indicated that both groups of students were able to demonstrate and apply their content knowledge in the lower-order and higher-order thinking domains. The scientific literacy test results showed that a higher percentage of students who underwent IBL exhibited high confidence in scientific inference and evaluation. On the basis of an exploratory factor analysis, two dimensions, which include object level and meta level cognitions, were defined. Through the self-efficacy survey following the implementation of IBL, students found themselves competent at setting their learning goals, describing their learning gains, and transferring skills from other disciplines.

13

Chang Chiou Yen, Maegan-Ruth Tan Hui En, Treruangrachada Anantaya Kylin,

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic:

Student Voice

Student Voice: Joy of Learning…and Teaching Too!

(Venue: D214)

A common question that students often ask is “how do I apply the Mathematics I learnt in class in everyday life?” It is not an easy question to answer as learning Mathematics is not only for application in daily life but for training of the mind as well. Last year, I had the chance to answer this question, with joy.

For the unit of Arithmetic in Year 1, concepts to be taught are selling price, marked up price, discount, speed, ratio and proportion, exchange rate and others. I expected that students would have varying degrees of understanding of these concepts, and I thought that their parents could be sharing these concepts in real life too. I then took inspiration from a holiday in Australia to gather artefacts: photographs, receipts, price tags, brochures and more. I next prepared a set of instructional slides and worksheet using these artefacts. The outcome was my students expressed joy as they worked on this unit, and I had joy teaching too. More important, I found that students could retain the concepts taught.

At this workshop, I will share the process that students engaged in so that they could apply Arithmetic concepts in real life. Students will also share what gave them joy in these lessons.

Concurrent Session II: 3.45pm to 4.25pm

No

Presenters

Abstract

1

Piroon Sirisakdi,Yenrutai Jongtanom,

Rajinibon School, Bangkok, Thailand

Topic:

Professional Development

Using Lesson Study to Develop Health Literacy Learning Units for G.1-G.12 Students in Rajinibon School, Bangkok, Thailand

(Venue: Raffles Room)

This case study of a Thai school involves a collaborative research undertaken by a team comprising school personnel as well as external stakeholders. The research was to address health issues amongst students; namely, obesity, malnutrition and infectious diseases.  The objectives were to (1) develop Health Literacy Learning Units for G1-G12 students and (2) study the results of these units on students’ Health Literacy as well as on teacher competencies. The methodology involved a 5-step model where students engaged in health-related activities and discussions as well as data analysis and presentations. Using a lesson study approach, teachers observed the students’ behaviors and used the information to collectively adjust their instructional plans. This session will highlight how the lesson study approach enhanced teachers’ collaborative and instructional competencies within an authentic problem-solving context.

2

Lucille Yap,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Humanities

The HOOK of Visible Thinking in the Learning Process

(Venue: D215)

“I am teaching, but are they learning?”, “What works best for learning?”… These are some questions that we, classroom teachers, often ask. As such, every classroom teacher seeks to create meaningful and powerful learning opportunities which promote authentic intellectual engagement that leads to deep understanding.

This workshop will offer insights into lesson enactment (STP, 2017) with a thinking focus. Participants will observe how the powers of thought can be shaped and communicated through Visible Thinking Routines like “See, Think, Wonder”. The tool will activate students’ prior knowledge, engage students in meaningful inquiry and application, develop students’ thinking and new understandings and connect learning to the larger world. In a nutshell, when students are engaged in the process of “Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn” , they will LEARN as they are actively engaged in thought processes.

3

Kirsten Clare M Negapatan, Celine Jessica Tam, Tan Xin Yi, Celeste, Irene Guo

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic:

Student Voice

Student Voice: Building a Culture of Student-Led Discussion (Full)

(Venue: E208)

In this session, Year 4 RGS students will share their experience in planning, conducting and leading a group of students from RGS, Kuo Chuan Presbyterian Secondary, Pierce Secondary, Raffles Institution and St. Joseph's Institution in a Socratic dialogue at the annual RGS Socratic Seminar. These student presenters first participated in the said event in 2017. A year later in February 2018, they took on the mantle of student facilitators at the Socratic Seminar. They will share insights into the factors that contribute to the success of the socratic dialogue, the challenges of leading such a discussion and the relevant preparatory work. 

Through a group discussion format where participants sit in a circle, the Socratic Seminar follows a set of protocols, expectations and guidelines. It provides a platform for students to engage in meaningful discussions with peers, and it encourages the development of leadership competencies in the areas of communication, self-awareness, interpersonal interactions, and civic responsibility (Seemiller, 2014). Participants are challenged to think deeply about a topic of discussion through questioning and sharing of different perspectives. Student facilitators play the important role of expanding on a participant’s idea, asking questions that keep the conversation going and ensuring that every participant is involved in the dialogue. 

This session provides useful tips for teachers to introduce Socratic Seminar in their classrooms or explore ways to engage students in an intellectual discourse. It is an engaging way to develop critical thinking as students are required to interact actively with the given text – cite evidence, ask questions, apply concepts, explain and evaluate points of view. Students are engaged in collaborative learning as they listen to their peers, learn to paraphrase, take turns, make eye contact and develop mutual respect for one another’s opinion.

4

Mak Wai Ling, Roslinda Chan,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Humanities

The Effectiveness of Inquiry-Based Approach for Differentiation in Lower Secondary Humanities

(Venue: D216)

Inquiry Based Learning is a process where students are involved in learning, investigating widely and building new understandings, meanings and knowledge. This study aimed to find out if inquiry-based learning carried out in Lower Secondary Humanities classes is effective in enhancing content mastery. Futher, we examined what elements of inquiry-based learning could engage learners in terms of differentiated learning.

We had carried out this study with two Year 1 and Year 2 History classes in 2015-2016, and three Year 2 Geography classes in 2015. The findings from this study will be useful to teachers who are interested to find out the benefits of inquiry-based learning.

5

Choo Li Lin, Masturah Abdul Aziz,

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic:

English Language/

Professional Development

A Cross-Disciplinary Study of Engagement in Teachers' Research Articles

(Venue: E206)

Academic discourse centrally involves interpersonal negotiation of meaning and dialogistic positioning. This study will examine how teachers engage their readers in research articles (RAs). Through a series of quantitative and qualitative textual analyses, this study will adopt Martin and White's (2005) Appraisal Theory to discuss how disciplinarity and genre can influence writers' use of engagement resources and their expression of stance. Our presentation will make explicit how classroom practitioners with different disciplinary backgrounds use engagement resources in writing for publication so that they facilitate knowledge building within the classroom.

6

Tan-Thum Kum Chee,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

English Language

Designing a Unit using Gifted Education Criteria and Standards

(Venue: D217)

In November 2017, a unit that I had designed and implemented – ‘Biographical Writing’ for Year 2 English Language in Raffles Girls' School (Secondary) – won the Curriculum Studies Award given by the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), USA.

        A unit submitted for consideration for the NAGC Curriculum Studies Award is scored on twelve criteria; the scoring is especially stringent for the first two criteria, namely, ‘Nature of Differentiation’ and ‘Talent Development’. This information is available on NAGC’s website. In this workshop, I will share how I understood these two criteria as I learnt from my first failed attempt at the award, and what I designed to meet these criteria in my second attempt. I will also share the work involved in submitting a unit for consideration for the award.

        This workshop is for unit designers who (i) wish to understand if their unit design has met Gifted Education criteria and standards; (ii) are interested to submit a unit for consideration for the NAGC Curriculum Studies Award. The audience should bring a unit that they have designed (hard copy), so that they can apply their learning during the workshop.

7

Chris Slatter,

Nanyang Girls’ High School

Discipline:

Science

Making Thinking Visible in the Science Classroom (Full)

(Venue: D218)

Introduction:

A key issue with teaching and learning science is the abstract nature of the discipline. Teachers can demonstrate, and students can observe, an experiment or phenomena, e.g. a change in temperature or the production of a gas, but it is impossible to observe the actual energy, particles and forces as they interact. Teachers may struggle with explaining what cannot be observed and students can become frustrated as they try to imagine what might be happening at a sub-microscopic level. This combination has the potential to create misconceptions in the mind of the student, contributing to a difficulty in learning.

In this presentation, the facilitator will share a variety of strategies that can be used in the classroom that allow both the teacher and his / her students to make their thinking visible using analogies and models. For example, most students are familiar with LEGO. Duplo LEGO bricks can be used by students to model elements, compounds and mixtures. Through visual inspection of students’ models, the teacher can quickly assess the level of their students’ understanding.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Participants will understand that abstract ideas in science can be made visible through the use of analogies and models. When students take things that are familiar (either conceptual or physical) and use them in a way that helps them to understand what is unfamiliar, then learning of abstract ideas can take place more easily.

2. Participants will learn a variety of different strategies that they can use to make thinking visible to their students. Similar strategies can be used by students to make their thinking clear to their teachers and their peers.

Theoretical Underpinning:

Learning takes place when a person in cognitive equilibrium encounters new knowledge. Cognitive disequilibrium then occurs as the individual connects and assimilates the new knowledge with what they already know. As new schemata, or knowledge structures, are formed, the individual returns to cognitive equilibrium (Jean Piaget, 1936). It is proposed that if new knowledge is presented to students through a context that they are already familiar with (i.e. using analogies and models) then the new knowledge will be more easily assimilated into the students’ existing knowledge.

Learning is a consequence of thinking (Clark and Linn, 2003). Learning improves when students are able to think through the concepts that they are studying, a process that takes time and energy and requires varied activities and many opportunities to make connections. In addition, good thinking (and hence learning) requires students to be open-minded, curious, sceptical and imaginative (Perkins and Ritchhart, 2004). Without these characteristics, good thinking will not take place and only shallow learning will occur (Hattie and Yates, 2014).

In order for students to learn science, they must be able to think through the concept that they are studying, but if they are unable to imagine what is taking place at a sub-microscopic level, shallow learning will occur and misconceptions will accumulate. It is therefore important for science students to make their thinking and learning visible so that they can reflect on their own work, and so that it can be evaluated by their peers and their teachers.

Conclusions:

General feedback from students, collected in a qualitative manner, is that they enjoy learning science through analogies and models. Students feel confident taking ideas that they are already familiar with and using them, through analogies, to explore and define abstract concepts that would be difficult to understand in isolation. In addition, encouraging students to come-up with their own analogies to explain abstract concepts in science fosters critical and creative thinking, which are important and enduring skills for students to learn.

8

Lim Er Yang (RGS), Thomas Jeremy Lee (RGS), Carol Goh (AS), Puah Tian Peng (AS),

Raffles Girls’ School, Admiralty Secondary

Topic:

ICT

Harnessing 1:1 - Inter-school sharing on “Tools We Used in Class” (FULL)

(Venue: Cyber Learning Centre)

In this session, we will be showing how we used specific applications to help deliver learning experiences that take advantage of connectivity, social interactions and processes within a classroom setting. We will share practical experiences and templates to help you plan for lessons using apps such as Peardeck, Edpuzzle and Student Learning Spaces. Do join us to explore how you can expose students and teachers to interactive lessons.

9

Khng Umay,

Angela Tan

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Science

Visible Thinking Routines to Facilitate Scientific Thinking

(Venue: D221)

In the teaching of Science to Lower Secondary students, we find that students tended to regard what they have learnt in class as a series of information to memorise and processes to practice. Little time is spent to explore the links between the pieces of new knowledge, as well as between their prior understanding.

We attempt to use Visible Thinking Routines based on the book "Making Thinking Visible" by Ron Ritchhart, Mark Church & Karin Morrison in our Science classroom in order to shift students' from rote learning of discrete scientific knowledge to a deepened conceptual understanding of a larger picture.

We selected visible thinking routines that encouraged students to link, consolidate and organise their knowledge, as well as heighten their metacognition. These routines were used repeatedly during our lessons.

The routines highlighted gaps in students’ understanding, which were addressed by teachers. We also compared the responses of our students in the early stage of the study with those in the later part of the study in order to analyse how their thinking had grown over time.

In this workshop, we will be sharing how these routines were used in our classes. By putting themselves in the shoes of students, participants will experience using the Thinking Routines during the session.

10

Vivien Willame, Safiah bte Ani, Kumbalingam Uthaman, Lee Hwee Ling, Li Junxian,

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic:

Learning Journeys

Aesthetics/Mother Tongue Teachers' Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Year 3 Learning Journey Experiences

(Venue: D222)

Since 2016, teachers from two departments (Aesthetics and Mother Tongue Languages) have collaborated to design and facilitate Learning Journeys (LJs) to Chinatown, Serangoon and Geylang Serai for Year Three students.

These Learning Journeys let students explore the culture and heritage of the main ethnic groups through their expressions of food, fashion and trade. Students’ learning is aided through a series of carefully crafted questions that will scaffold their appreciation of the socio-cultural diversity in Singapore. They analyze and evaluate how over time the communities have a left a cultural imprint in these areas, the implications for each community’s cultural identity and ultimately our national identity.

Qualitative data results from students will be shared at this session that will support the interdisciplinary collaboration between Aesthetics and Mother Tongue Department.

11

Sarah Esther Goldman, Rabiatul Adawiyah bte Nor I, Rachael Foo,

Raffles Girls’ School

Topic:

Student Voice

Student Voice: Uncovering the Singapore Spirit (Full)

(Venue: E207)

The RGS Learning Journey (LJ) Programme is a school-wide programme held at the end of Term 1. It involves all academic departments working together to conceptualise and implement various out-of-school visits with its learning outcomes centering around the CCE Big Ideas of ‘Identity, Relationships and Choices’. In this session, a group of Year 3 students will share how the week-long LJ allows them to undcover the Singapore Spirit. Students will share the varied activities that require them to interact with the various local communities, observe and investigate the wet markets and reflect on the walk along quaint Telok Ayer Street. The learning activities were carefully designed to engage students experientially and in a multi-sensory way, to make learning rich and to help students to articulate the Singapore spirit.

At the 2011 Singapore Perspectives Conference organised by the Institute of Policy Studies, the Singapore Spirit is defined as: 'our ability to constantly reinvent ourselves, to seize every opportunity that comes our way and to excel. It is a spirit of entrepreneurship, efficiency, tolerance, acceptance and diversity. It is the spirit to dare'.

The idea of the Singapore Spirit can be abstract to secondary school students. Trying to unpack and develop this notion may pose a considerable challenge to teachers. This session aims to provide teachers with the learner perspective on how the Singapore Spirit can be understood through carefully selected narratives. The session will focus on two of these narratives, namely, the Narrative of Harmony and the Narrative of Care, and how young learners construct their personal meaning of the Singapore Spirit.

12

Chang Chiou Yen, Koh King Koon,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Mathematics

Self-Regulated Learning: What It Can Look Like

(Venue: D214)

All students want to achieve high grades in school. However they may not have a plan to achieve that. If students could monitor their own learning in a systematic way, they could learn to their fullest potential.

With that in mind, we designed a spreadsheet that enables students to monitor their own learning and gives the teacher feedback on students’ learning. The students’ self-monitoring is modelled after Self-Regulated Learning (SRL), or “the process whereby learners personally activate and sustain cognitions, affects, and behaviors that are systematically oriented toward the attainment of personal goal” (Zimmerman and Schunk, 2011)). 

Each student has an excel sheet to assist them in reflecting and monitoring their learning. The learning objectives of each worksheet are clearly listed in the excel sheet so that students have a goal to work towards, can self-check if they are progressing in the intended direction and can self-evaluate their level of mastery of the learning objectives. Individual reflection done by students are ported onto another spreadsheet that only the teacher has access to. This helps the teacher to monitor students’ progress.

At the end of each unit, there are differentiated worksheets for students to choose from. Based on their reflection on their mastery of the unit, students could choose between consolidation, enrichment and advancement worksheets. The latter two worksheets are beyond the syllabus so as to allow students who are ready, to explore the unit further. Those who feel they need more practice could attempt the consolidation worksheets.

In this workshop, we will share the design and use of the spreadsheet, and the survey results regarding SRL. We argue that Self-Regulated Learning, combined with Differentiated Instruction, help students to become independent learners.

13

Nuraini Abdul Gapor, Nurashikin Hanafi, Fadhilah Ramlee,

Raffles Girls’ School

Discipline:

Mother Tongue

Portfolio Assessment in Higher Malay Language

(Venue: D223)

Portfolio Assessment as an alternative assessment was implemented for Higher Malay Language (HML) in Raffles Girls' School in the last two years in response to the school's encouragement to use different modes of assessments. This workshop is intended to share on how portfolios could be used for assessment purposes, and to promote the habit of reflection in students.  The Workshop Objectives (Skills and Knowledge) are

1. To state the purposes of portfolio assessments. 

2. To demonstrate the implementation of portfolios as an assessment tool. 

3. To illustrate the ways to promote the habit of reflection in students.